NEWS

THE LIGHT & SHADOW SALON presents LISTENING! Curated by The School of Sound
Thursday 25th November 2010

LISTENING! notes

John and Marsha (1951) – Stan Freberg
In the 50s and 60s, recorded comedy was extremely popular in the US, fueled by the work of Lenny Bruce, Bob Newhart, Woody Allen, Shelley Berman and others. Freberg was known for his voice work in TV and film when he recorded John and Marsha, a satire of daytime soap operas, released as a 45 rpm single.


“Stories and Memory” – Piers Plowright

Radio producer, Piers Plowright introduces three women with tales to tell and reflects on the power of the voice to conjure image and memory, time and place.
Stand By Your Man (produced by Peter Everett, 1980, R4)
Bus (Plowright, 1993, R3)
Setting Sail/Alison (Plowright, 1985, R4)


The Quiet in the Land (1969) – Glenn Gould

One of five pieces prepared for the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, which are radio documentaries or “oral tone poems” that examine the lives of people living in isolation. CBC Records


L’amiral cherche une maison a louer (The Admiral Looks for a House to Rent) 1916 – Tristan Tzara/Marcel Janco/Richard Huelsenbeck

The Cabaret Voltaire in Zurich, founded by Hugo Ball and Emmy Hennings, is generally accepted as the birthplace of Dada. It was here a few weeks later, on 30 March 1916, that Tzara, Huelsenbeck and Janco performed the first ‘simultaneous poem’. This is a poem that could really only exist in space and time – in other words, as performance. Meaning was to be derived experientially, not through discursive language.

Pudenda (1993) – Scanner
Taken from the debut Scanner album, featuring early controversial work that used found mobile phone conversations with a radio scanner, trawling the airwaves, using the hidden noise of the modern metropolis as the symbol of the place where hidden meanings and missed contacts emerge.


Facets (1999) – Trevor Wishart

“Facets and Siren (later in the programme) were part of Two Women, commissioned by the DAAD, and received its first performance in the 50th Anniversary of Musique Concrete concert at the Parochialkirke in Berlin in September, 1998, using the diffusion system of the Berlin Technical University. They are part of a search for different aesthetics for the creation of sonic art. I call these works ‘Voiceprints’ (in English ‘voiceprints’ are, literally, voice recordings used by the police to trace suspects or missing persons). The movements treat the voices of the subjects in the manner of personal portraits, or political cartoons.
Facets features Princess Diana talking about press photographers: ‘There was a relationship which worked before, but now I can’t tolerate it because it’s become abusive, and it’s harassment.’- Trevor Wishart


Pour en finir avec le jugement de Dieu (To Have Done With the Judgement of God) (1947) – Antonin Artaud

Madman/theorist/philosopher/playwright Antonin Artaud’s final work was written after several years’ internment in psychiatric institutions which roughly corresponded to the duration of WWII. It is a heretic’s scatological tirade at the extreme of the linguistic lunatic fringe and was perhaps Artaud’s electronic revenge against his incarcerators. It was commissioned by Ferdinand Pouey, director of dramatic and literary broadcasts for French Radio, but at the last minute was cancelled by Vladimir Porche, director of the station. Pouey quit his job in protest. Artaud died a little over a month later, profoundly disappointed over the rejection of the work. It was not broadcast over the airwaves until thirty years later.


Waiting for the Electrician or Someone Like Him (1968) – The Firesign Theatre

The first of a series of albums by the Firesign based on the traditions of radio theatre – audio drama, “ear plays,” movies-for-your-mind; an album of the sixties that sums up America as of that historic summer.


Nouvelle Vague (1990) – Jean-Luc Godard

From the film by Godard. ECM Records released the film’s complete soundtrack as an audio CD.


Berlin Indoors (Slow Motion) (1999) – Werner Cee

German composer and sound artist, Werner Cee composed this piece at the Technische Universität Berlin. Published in 1999 by Edition RZ as part of a CD collection, Inventionen ’98 – 50 Jahre Musique Concrète.

Hearts, Lungs and Minds (2008) – John Wynne
Sound artist John Wynne and photographer Tim Wainwright were artists-in-residence for one year at Harefield Hospital, one of the world’s leading centres for heart and lung transplants. This ‘composed documentary’, produced by Falling Tree Productions, explores the experiences of transplant patients and the extraordinary issues raised by this invasive, last-option medical procedure. It weaves intensely personal narratives with the sounds of the hospital environment, which can have an enormous effect on patients, shifting unpredictably from comforting to irritating, from reassuring to alarming. All the sounds come from the hospital, though sometimes they are abstracted as the piece explores the boundaries between documentary and radio art.


The King of Marvin Gardens (1972) – Bob Rafelson

The opening sequence of a film about an Atlantic City disc jockey played by Jack Nicholson.

Siren (1999) – Trevor Wishart
(See Facets above.) “Siren presents Margaret Thatcher quoting St Francis of Assisi: ‘Where there is discord, may we bring harmony.’ The piece opens with the voice of the announcer at York station, which is slowly transformed. Sounds of passing trains are subtly tuned using filters focused on the pitches (and their harmonics) of the metal-resonances of the rails. We also hear the voices of the Apollo-11 astronauts, as we journey away from the 60s. Various other sounds are used here, including those of a sheep-auctioneer and the clatter of metal sheep-transporting pens, recorded at Malton market.” – Trevor Wishart

60 Hertz (1997) – David Slusser
Produced by film composer Slusser, this piece is based on the harmonics (and subharmonics) of 60 Hz built slowly in waves as a Scottish engineer describes 60 cycle power and how he was once electrocuted.


The Piano Tuner (2008) – Dario Swade, Michael Aaglund and Jean-Marc Petsas

Produced by a sound designer, film editor and composer on the Without Images workshop at the National Film and Television School

The School of Sound http://www.schoolofsound.co.uk

***********************************************************************************************************************************************THE LIGHT & SHADOW SALON suggests….

MANIFESTO

Manifesto is a series of quarterly happenings where adventurous artists collaborate to expand perceptions of a shared creative experience.

Manifesto Summer is fast approaching! Find out more about the artists listed on the flyer above by going HERE

To get more information about future manifesto events and featured artists join our mailing list at this address: manifestok@live.co.uk.

***********************************************************************************************************************************************THE LIGHT & SHADOW SALON suggests….

Our friends at the Czech Centre are organising a very special screening of Karel Zeman’s pioneering films, this upcoming Sunday at the Barbican.

Zeman is widely thought of as the Czech Melies, and if you don’t know his work I strongly suggest you all flock to this rare screening (the original prints belong to the Czech archive, and are as yet unavailable on DVD, so it might be a while before you get to see them again on the big screen).

Hope to see you all there.


*********************************************************************************************************************************************** THE LIGHT & SHADOW SALON suggests….

Animation Film Season
at Ciné lumière

14 – 20 April 2010

Celebrating the variety and dynamism of new images and multimedia creation, Ciné lumière welcomes a selection of French, British and Czech animation films and will present several prize-winning works.

For the British selection, the Royal College of Art (RCA) offers works by graduates in animation, which are a showcase of creativity, imaginative wit and sublime experimentation. Some of the directors featured, Johnny Kelly, Joe King, Laurie Hill, Max Hattler, Gaelle Denis, Run Wrake, Christoph Steger, Siri Melchior and Stuart Hilton, will be present.

Dix, 4 and Anima, shown in the 2009 French Animation Film Festival Nemo, are amongst the highlights of the French strand, bringing together some of the most cutting-edge new images from across the Channel.

The Czech Republic is represented by five young men who are considered to be the future generation of Czech animators. Moving from cartoon via pixilation to puppet and 3D animation they all combine remarkable technique with strong artistic skills and vision. Directors Noro Drziak and Michal Zabka will attend the screenings on 18 and 20 April respectively.

To compliment the season there are two further events held at the Horse Hospital. ‘Five Brave Men from FAMU’ (1 – 23 April) is an exhibition of photographs, puppets, props, designs and story-boards presenting works by the Czech film directors, artists and animators featured in the Ciné lumière season. In addition the Light & Shadow Salon (22 April) offers a panorama of groundbreaking contemporary animation and looks at the influence that Eastern European and Russian animation has had on the West through an evening of discussions and screenings.

With animation continuing to break down boundaries, be sure not to miss this opportunity to see where the next phase will take us!

wed 14 apr 8.30pm | programme 1
sun 18 apr 8.30pm | programme 2
tue 20 apr 8.30pm | programme 3

£7, conc. £5

For further information and photos please contact:
Natacha Antolini on 020 7073 1365 or natacha.antolini@ambafrance.org.uk
Naomi Crowther on 020 7073 1333 or naomi.crowther@ambafrance.org.uk

Venue:
Ciné lumière at the Institut français
17 Queensberry Place, London, SW7 2DT
T. 020 7073 1350
http://www.institut-francais.org.uk

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Last minute addition to the February programme
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I have the pleasure to announce that Patrick Bokanowski, a true visionary artist, has given us permission to screen an excerpt from his seminal film “L’ange” at the forthcoming February Salon!
Another reason not to miss it…

Check the Upcoming Events section for further info on the February Salon.

Published on February 7, 2010 at 12:22 pm  Comments Off on NEWS  
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